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Tangra is a region in east Kolkata that traditionally houseed a variety of business owned by people of Hakka Chinese origin. The first record of travel from China to India is provided in the travelogue of Fa-Hien circa 5th Century AD. Most of the standing structures have been built, over many years, by the industrious Hakka Chinese and over the past several decades, it has served as the location of kolkata's Chinatown and the only Chinatown in India to this day.
Food from Tangra is the adaptation of Chinese seasoning and cooking techniques to Indian conditions. Chinese foods prepared in India tend to be flavoured with spices such as cumin, coriander seeds and turmeric, which with a few regional exceptions, are traditionally not associated with much of Chinese cuisine. Hot chilli, ginger, garlic and yoghurt are also frequently used in dishes. This makes Indian Chinese food similar in taste to many ethnic dishes in Southeast Asian countries such as Singapore and Malaysia, which have strong Chinese and Indian cultural influences. Non-staple dishes are therefore served with generous helpings of gravy, although they can be ordered "dry" or "without gravy". Culinary styles often seen in Indian Chinese fare include Chilli (implying hot and batter-fried), Manchurian (implying a sweet and salty brown sauce) and Szechwan (Sichuan, implying a spicy red sauce). Those correspond loosely, if at all, with authentic Chinese food preparation. Scallions and soy sauce are used in plenty to add a "Chinese touch" to the food.
(Sichuan, implying a spicy red sauce). Those correspond loosely, if at all, with authentic Chinese food preparation. Scallions and soy sauce are used in plenty to add a "Chinese touch" to the food.

Tangra is home to Indian Chinese food.